What is that citation doing?

Saying “this is not my work!” Saying “this is the work of [named person or entity]!” Showing where the author found information or an idea. Showing other people where to find that information or idea, too. Showing that someone, anyone, other than the author has previously stated this piece of information or articulated this idea. […]

GET IT IN WRITING: On Elsevier’s Revised Sharing/Hosting Policies

Elsevier, a major academic publisher, announced new policies yesterday articulating how they are comfortable with authors sharing their articles online. A number of other folks have already reviewed these policy documents, though few have offered a full commentary or interpretation (perhaps because there are just so many moving pieces here.)…

11th Circuit Rules On Georgia State Fair Use Case

The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals issued its ruling today in Cambridge University Press et. al. v. Patton – otherwise known as “the Georgia State case.” This is a case in which academic publishers (Cambridge UP, Oxford UP, and Sage) sued a public university for use of excerpts from books…

On turning down a job

Fairly recently, I was approached by a graduate professional program to teach a short, for-credit, winter-term course on copyright. I was really excited by the opportunity – I mostly lead one-shot sessions, and I was looking forward to getting into more depth with a group of students. I’d started planning…

What is the government’s interest in copyright? Not that of the public.

Like many other geeklaw & policy folks, I was baffled from the get-go by the decisions of federal prosecutors to pursue massive criminal charges against Aaron Swartz for downloading papers from JSTOR. I could understand that his activities constituted problematic behavior, but not the blustering punitive response. If Aaron’s wrongful…

What every researcher should know about copyright

This is a cross-post with the Research @ the U of M blog – so some of the info here is specific to the University of Minnesota. This could have been a “Frequently Asked Questions” list – except that the questions I am most frequently asked by researchers usually have…

Copyright time-travel is a bad idea

©Libn, circa 1976The lawsuit against Georgia State University brought by a number of academic publishers (including Cambridge, Oxford, and Sage) and funded by the ostensibly non-profit Copyright Clearance Center proceeds to trial on Monday morning. At issue is the widespread re-use and sharing of academic content among faculty, staff, and…

css.php