Solutions Manual Solutions

Solutions manuals are turning out to be one of the BIG challenges of COVID teaching – most instructors are accustomed to having students buy their own textbooks, but are still pretty likely to be putting a solutions manual on physical course reserve. (I.e., making sure there’s a copy in the library that students can check […]

11th Circuit Rules On Georgia State Fair Use Case

The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals issued its ruling today in Cambridge University Press et. al. v. Patton – otherwise known as “the Georgia State case.” This is a case in which academic publishers (Cambridge UP, Oxford UP, and Sage) sued a public university for use of excerpts from books…

And I thought “Can We Scan This?” was a hard question…

We have some really amazing and interesting things in our Archives and Special Collections; when we have some funds available, there’re always things we want to digitize for preservation purposes, and for public sharing. Unfortunately, copyright is often a huge barrier to scanning things and making them available to the…

Where copyrights come from (part I) – Copyediting does -not- create a new copyright

In US law, copyright magically comes into existence when someone creates an original work of authorship. The copyright is actually based in the original expression contained in the work, not whether there was effort involved in the work’s creation. So for the specific arrangement of words (+/- images) that make…

If takedown notices are what it took for you to -really think- about rights ownership in your publications…

Last week, Academia.edu started receiving mass takedown notices from Elsevier (an academic publisher) for papers uploaded to the site by their authors. This has come as an offensive surprise to many of the authors who received the notices, and to many other academic authors who heard about the takedown requests….

What every researcher should know about copyright

This is a cross-post with the Research @ the U of M blog – so some of the info here is specific to the University of Minnesota. This could have been a “Frequently Asked Questions” list – except that the questions I am most frequently asked by researchers usually have…

This is NOT a small technicality!

One major argument publishers have taken with respect to open access mandates is that they harm the publishers’ intellectual property rights. While “harm” is relative, it is true that an open access mandate forces publishers to handle intellectual property rights differently. Just, not in the ways publishers say it does….

Academic publishing is full of problems; lets get them right.

I can’t quite tell whether this piece from The Atlantic is meant to be editorial or news (it’s okay if it’s both, or neither – I’m not picky about traditional delineations like that.) It’s pretty opinion-y, and it’s an opinion that I very much share – academic publishing has some…

JSTOR opens access to some collections; notes this is(n’t) in response to Swartz case

JSTOR announced yesterday that they are opening access to a portion of their older holdings, free for use by the entire world. They noted this was part of a larger effort to make their resources more available to researchers unaffiliated with institutions that have JSTOR access. They also noted that…

Jail? For downloading too many articles???

On Tuesday, a lot of the conversation in my neck of the internet was about the arraignment of activist & open access advocate Aaron Swartz on federal charges of wire fraud and unauthorized network use. Most of the discussion was among the geeklaw aficionados, and  I’ve been kind of surprised…

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